Archive for January, 2011

January 31, 2011

A sadly predictable crime

by Daniel Cubias

A nine-year-old girl in Arizona is brutally shot down by a psychopath who may also be a right-wing nut.

No, this is not the story of Christina Green, the little girl born on 9/11 who was killed in the assassination attempt on Rep. Gabrielle Giffords in Tucson. As heartbreaking and appalling as her death was, it has not lacked for media attention.

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January 31, 2011

Daddy and abortion

by Keyla Cedano

Read Part I and Part II

If you haven’t been up to date on this series, this is the last of a three-part piece regarding the issue of abortion. We have already discussed abortion within the Latino community, and whether the issue pertains to women only. Now, we will acknowledge the third piece to this puzzle; potential daddies.

It should be a known fact that whenever a man and a woman engage in intercourse they risk, even whilst using protection, an unplanned pregnancy.  If all parties involved are liable, then it would seem fair that the rights to decide whether to keep or abort the baby of the would-be mom and dad are equally enforced. Ideally, we would only have conscientious adults having sex; level-headed enough to have open discussion on such a “hot” issue, and able to make a decision together.

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January 31, 2011

Being Latino at Sundance Film Festival, Last Day

by Ulises Silva

Our fifth and last day began like every other day during our coverage of Sundance: with a mutter about getting too old for this and a yawning shuttle ride to a movie theater. While Ari benefited from a proper ticket and an extra hour of sleep, I made my way to Main Street and the Egyptian Theater at 7 a.m. I had to catch this screening of Gun Hill Road: otherwise, I will have interviewed Esai Morales about a film I didn’t even watch.

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January 31, 2011

Please don’t call me señora

by Lisa Quinones-Fontanez

It happened at FoodTown while making my biweekly comprita. Pushing my shopping cart at 7:30 a.m. on a Saturday, purchasing a pillow sack of Canilla rice, cans of Goya beans, the ingredients for sofrito and all the other necessary items to feed a small family. The young cashier referred to me as señora. I’ve been called other things before: ma’am, miss, mom and lady. But being called señora by this high school girl, made me cringe.

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January 31, 2011

Where has the respect gone?

by Justice Sanchez

My mother was born in Puerto Rico. My father was born in the Dominican Republic. Growing up as a first generation born in the immigrant hub of New York City, I have witnessed changes in the way our Hispanic communities execute respect.

Coming from a time where minors did not interject in adult conversations, let alone blatantly disrespect them; I am saddened to see the steady decline in respect for not only our elders, but our cultures as well. Growing up, mi familia made sure that I understood my place as a child. There were unspoken rules which I knew:

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January 31, 2011

Yoga kicked my butt!

by Jennifer Turano

It’s been about three years since I’d attended a gym regularly. Being a student means a lot of time sitting at home with your nose in a book, and often very little cash. I simply didn’t have the time or money to go. But three years of constant studying leaves its marks. I have less energy, many of my favorite clothes don’t fit, and lately I’ve been having trouble falling asleep. Part of me wants to blame it on me getting older, but my 60-year-old suegro has more energy AND is in better shape than me… And it was then I realized: I have to go back to the gym.

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January 30, 2011

Sundance Film Review: Granito

by Ulises Silva

Granito
Directed by Pamela Yates

The Bottom Line: An emotionally charged, compelling, and brilliant documentary about the genocide trial against Efraín Ríos Montt, and the way a documentary’s outtakes are serving as key evidence.

“Sometimes a story told long ago can speak to you in the present.”

These are the haunting opening words to Pamela Yates’ Granito, a documentary that poignantly illustrates film’s power to effect change—even if that change doesn’t come about immediately or in the manner hoped for. Oscillating between despair and hope, Granito can be emotionally hard to sit through, but ultimately reminds us of our obligations toward the pursuit of justice.

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January 30, 2011

Being Latino at Sundance Film Festival, Day 4

by Ulises Silva

Day 4 of our coverage of Sundance started early—very. In fact, it technically started at midnight with a screening of a Colombian satire, All Your Dead Ones. Which we watched right after waitlisting a 10 p.m. Tuesday screening of Silent House, an American remake of the Uruguayan La Casa Muda.

Silent House will literally keep you on edge for its entire frantic, blood-curdling run. Which is great for horror fans, but not so great for those who slept with the lights on for six weeks after watching Ghost. I think Silent House will be the next big horror film in theaters, and I have to imagine it’ll make moviegoers want to see the Uruguayan original. Could this be the start of a new influx of remakes that will do for Latino horror what The Grudge and The Ring did for Asian horror?

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January 28, 2011

BL’s Friday night cocktail- Mojito (video)

Ready to start your Friday night?

¡Salud!

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January 28, 2011

Who made the chicharron first?

by Carla Caraballo

“OMG, This is so delicious! Who started making this?”  That’s how our conversation started in a Dominican restaurant. My friend being Puerto Rican, immediately said, “We did of course!” I said, “No way.” As our debate continued, I couldn’t dismiss it. How and where did this “chicharron” craze start and who made it first? After several phone calls to family and friends the same answers were repeated, “The Puerto Ricans, the Dominicans…” It was to no avail.

I began to do the research. Several sites led me to recipes and seasonings. I changed my search criteria to ‘History of Chicharron’. This in itself was overwhelming, and I kept finding different recipes from South America and Mexico.

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