Archive for November, 2010

November 30, 2010

Forgive, forget and move on

by AJ Rodriguez

They say the holidays are meant for togetherness and family values. There are about four holidays in our calendar that force us to interact with family members, most of which we try to avoid, for whatever reason.

Then there are those occasions when someone passes away and you must be there, just to show face. You definitely don’t want everyone else to call you out as the one who didn’t show up to Nana’s funeral. So, you must breathe and reboot, as I say, bring yourself together and endure those people that caused that ulcer in the first place.

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November 30, 2010

Are you the next Latino leader?

by Cristina Villarreal

Latinos are the largest minority group in the country.  There are 46 million Latinos in the United States.  In spite of our large numbers, we seem to have a shortage of a national leader.  According to a recent Pew Hispanic poll, Latinos do not have a national leader.  When Latinos were asked “who is the most important Latino leader in the country today,” nearly two-thirds, 64%, of Latinos said they did not know and 10% said “no one.” Latinos who did have a response named Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Congressman Luis Gutierrez, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, and News Anchor Jorge Ramos.

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November 30, 2010

Moneyball: Investing in Latino Baseball Futures

by Ryan Almodovar

The lights are off, the seats are empty, the bats are quiet, and if you’re like me, you’re already waiting for the return of baseball in the spring. I do my best to keep myself occupied in the mean time; tracking prospects playing fall ball, watching front office moves, and of course, keeping abreast of trade rumors (I still can’t believe Jeter hasn’t signed). I happened to come across an article from the New York Times amongst the baseball news, not about trades, but about a hot new investment that many well-to-do experts are getting into. They’re not investing in derivatives or loans, but in the futures market. Not the financial futures market – but the futures of Latin American baseball prospects.

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November 30, 2010

What’s your status? World AIDS Week 2010

by Nicolle Morales Kern

Back in October I wrote about importance of talking about HIV/ AIDS, introduced you to the reality of porn stars testing positive for HIV/ AIDS and those who actually desire being infected. This week is World AIDS Week, with World AIDS Day being tomorrow, December 1, and I wonder if any of my previous posts had any affect on you.

If you think that you are not affected by HIV/AIDS because you do not know anyone infected or do not engage in risky behavior, then think again. The fact is that this is a completely avoidable disease that only exists because we as people choose not to engage in preventive measures or may not have the funds to practice safe behavior.

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November 29, 2010

Mi dia Latino

by Eileen Rivera-de la Hoz

Those of us who live near large urban centers have a myriad of cultural and artistic events at our disposal. For the most part, these events are free.  I recently attended the Artisans Fair at Hostsos Community College, sponsored by Comite Noviembre, in New York City. Founded in 1987, Comite Noviembre’s mission is to “commemorate and acknowledge all aspects of Puerto Rican life from the social and cultural, to the educational, economic and political.” The volunteers who contribute to the organization, work year-round in planning events that serve to enrich the community.

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November 29, 2010

An affair to remember: Centro Hispano

by Keyla Cedano

Located at the heart of downtown in Reading, PA along 5th street, El Centro Hispano has stood firmly amid city life for more than 40 years. What began as an attempt to establish much needed help for the Latino Community, has evolved into a pillar for Latinos in the Reading, PA area. With services catering to kids, adults, and the elderly, the center is the go-to place for anything from notary services, social assistance, transportation, and even a kid’s café.

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November 29, 2010

Remembering the Butterflies

by Jennifer Turano

November 25th was the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women. The day was chosen to pay homage to the Mirabal sisters – political activists from the Dominican Republic, who were killed on that day in 1960, on what is believed to be the orders of dictator Rafael Trujillo.

 

Las Mariposas (the Butterflies), as they are called, actually refer to 3 out of 4 sisters – Patria, Minerva and Maria Theresa. They, along with their sister Dede, were born in Ojo de Agua, Salcedo—what is now known as Hermanas Mirabal Province.

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November 26, 2010

Machismo – a Latino phenomenon?

by Jennifer Turano

The past few weeks here on Being Latino, my fellow bloggers have brought up issues that have sparked discussions about Machismo. Not the blogs per se, but rather the comments on them have started debates about our Latino men and “their” Machismo. I’m well aware of Machismo being present throughout most of America Latina, but I don’t really like the way we talk about this as a Latino phenomenon. Is it, really?

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November 26, 2010

From the barrio to the barnyard

by Ryan Almovodar

The conversation goes down the same way pretty much every time.

“…what about you, Ryan? Where are you from?” They ask.

“Well, I’m from Queens originally, but I’ve lived in Lancaster, PA since I was five.”

“Oh really? Lancaster, wow. Are you Amish?”

I knew this was coming. There are few things that will make me lose my cool, and when people look me in the face, see my tan skin, hear my Spanish last name, see my Adidas sneakers and New York Mets baseball hat, I have to wonder what about me makes them think that I’m Amish.

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November 25, 2010

Latinos: Stoic against chronic pain

by Viktoria Valenzuela

After I gave birth to my two children, I couldn’t seem to shake the postpartum depression and chronic pain even years after they were born. Latinos are stoic and sometimes don’t admit to feeling pain. We are least likely to seek medical treatment.  When we do feel pain we often have home remedies to cure them.  My home remedy was “laying down” or “walking it off” because the women in my family had given birth to twice as many children (if not, more) as I had and never complained once.  I’d lay down until the pain stopped, but when it lasted for over a year, I had to see a doctor.  My doctor said I had developed something called fibromyalgia; a waste basket syndrome diagnosed when pain becomes chronic.  When she wanted to give me Prozac I said “heck no” and asked for something different. We had noticed over time that my pain increased with stress or depression factors in my life, so I opted to skip dreaded medication and see a therapist that specialized in hypnotherapy and person centered treatment.  I am happy to say the postpartum depression is gone thanks to therapy, but sadly fibromyalgia is forever.

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